Civil dispute - a neighbour

I’m having a dispute with a neighbour about our property boundaries

Unless a crime has been committed, or is in progress, we don’t have the authority to intervene in a boundary dispute.

If you can’t find an amicable solution with your neighbour, we suggest asking the advice of a solicitor to resolve this.

You could also contact your bank, building society, or whoever holds your deeds, to confirm the boundaries.

You may also find these resources useful:

This information is provided courtesy of Ask the Police.

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I’m having a dispute with a neighbour about smoke from their bonfires or barbecues

If a bonfire appears dangerously out of control and you're worried about the safety of people or property, call 999 and ask for the fire brigade.

Lighting a bonfire is not illegal, but the smoke can be a statutory nuisance. The environmental health department of your local council will be able to take action if the smoke from the bonfire is classed as a statutory nuisance.

You'll need this information: 

  • who's lighting the bonfire
  • what time
  • what are the effects of the bonfire
  • your details
     

The council can stop the person from committing a statutory nuisance, and failure to comply can lead to prosecution.

However, if the bonfires are only infrequent, it's unlikely the council will take any action.

The following resources may also be of use:

 

This information is provided courtesy of Ask the Police.

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I’m having a dispute with a neighbour about their children’s toys, such as balls or frisbees, in my garden

Involving the police in this type of issue is not always the best course of action as a first response. It can escalate the issue and cause more problems for both parties.

If possible, speak to your neighbour about the problem and try and resolve it between you.

Please note, if you keep the toys and refuse to give them back, you may eventually end up facing prosecution yourself.

Involving the police in this type of issue is not always the best course of action as a first response. It can escalate the issue and cause more problems for both parties.

If possible, speak to your neighbour about the problem and try and resolve it between you.

Please note, if you keep the toys and refuse to give them back, you may eventually end up facing prosecution yourself.

 

This information is provided courtesy of Ask the Police.

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I’m having a dispute with a neighbour about their CCTV camera pointing at my property

Many people are installing closed-circuit television (CCTV) as a home security measure as it's proved to be an effective tool in fighting crime. Cameras used for limited household purposes are not subject to the Data Protection Act 2018.

However, if the footage covers areas beyond this, such as neighbouring streets or other properties, it may create problems. There could be issues regarding privacy and harassment if you're being recorded in your home.

The first step is to speak to your neighbour to see if they'll reposition the camera so that it doesn't point at your property. If that doesn't work and you want to take further action, we recommend getting legal advice from a solicitor.

You may find resources belonging to the Information Commissioner’s Office useful as well. 



This information is provided courtesy of Ask the Police.

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